Protesters, dressed as aliens, call for genuine climate change solutions as they try to gain entry into the ongoing high-level dialogue on climate change at the Asian Development Bank headquarters in Manila June 16, 2009. REUTERS/Cheryl Ravelo (PHILIPPINES CONFLICT ENVIRONMENT IMAGES OF THE DAY)

Hollywood has always depicted aliens as strong, powerful beings with antennas and many legs or grey colored with massive eyes. Recent studies by scientists have successfully depicted the accurate look of the aliens which is pretty close to that of ours. This new research upon the physical traits of the extra-terrestrials has revealed some astonishing facts about the unknown beings.
When we imagine the structure of living beings beyond our Earth, we do not have much imagination to go by as the only living beings we have seen are on our planet and none other to derive example from. We either imagine them as a blend of insects and humans or any other variations of the living beings in our world. However, there is simply no guarantee that they look anything like that.
Darwin’s evolutionary theory when applied to this new study reveals exactly what the alien life might look like. According to the same, the mechanisms that underwent our evolution might look almost same for the alien life which leads to the conclusion that they might look just like us in reality.
According to Sam Levin, a researcher at the Oxford’s Department of Zoology, astrobiologists are tasked to understand the extra-terrestrial life but making predictions and assumptions based on life forms from just a single planet makes it hard. This lack of variations to choose from is the reason why researchers are ever so glad to find even a hint of extra-terrestrial life besides Earth.
This recent theory provides a fresh new approach to the existing evolutionary theory that does not depend upon the details of Earth-based life. This new approach is useful in the sense of extra-terrestrial life that is constituted of silicon or does not possess any DNA and even breathes nitrogen.