Home » News » Science » Autonomous Benthic Rover sets new world record for covering longest distance and survival period beneath the ocean
Science

Autonomous Benthic Rover sets new world record for covering longest distance and survival period beneath the ocean

Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

An independent and computerized seafloor sycophant has created a new world record for covering the longest traveled distance and survival period below the sea. The Benthic Rover, which is designed and deployed to monitor climatic patterns and collect other data since 2009, has set a new world record by traveling the longest distance and sustaining for the longest period under the ocean, for an entire year. Benthic Rover is designed and developed by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) from the US. It is the only untethered and entirely self-directed seafloor creep that is employed for studying climatic changes and other inside details of the sea.

Intended exclusively for climate study, the rover later implemented for searching and studying each single materials situated under the ocean including jewels, new medicinal therapies, oil, submarine existence, or oceanic communities. Over the year, the underwater robots are taking the lead on the journey for acknowledging sea life and recently, the rover has broken its own record by spending the longest period inside the ocean and by covering the largest distance while orbiting under the sea. To be straightforward, the Rover didn’t face much struggle as it is the only untethered and autonomous seafloor crawler in existence, and the broken record was its own.

The Benthic Rover currently is operating at Station M, a region filled with flat, mud, and abyssal seafloor which goes down to 4,000 meters is located around 220 kilometers from the California coastline. The marine ecologist of MBARI Ken Smith and his associates have been reviewing and monitoring the Station M since 1989.

In November 2016, the Benthic Rover was regained following its record run of one entire year. In this one year and two days, the River is recorded to travel a distance of around one mile (Approx.1.6 kilometers). Since 2009, the Rover has been in service in parallel and has been progressively covering the operational period alongside the traveled distance.

About the author

Steve Morrison

Steve Morrison is a budding journalist who intends to build a bright career in the media industry. He is a fitness enthusiast who loves to cover the latest news on health, fitness, and lifestyle.

1 Comment

Click here to post a comment

Visitor Statistics